What do you give that special person that has everything? Someone who loves to do things, you can’t just run out and do just anything anytime, anywhere?

Think about this, how about a ride in one of our FIVE War War II Warbird Airplanes? planes

Climb Aboard History – Experience the Flight of a Lifetime!

All of our warbird rides follow the same format, unless otherwise noted. Please plan on arriving at the facility (or the airport where the planes are visiting) at least a half hour before your scheduled flight time.

 

Passengers must be 18 years of age or older, and must weigh less than 250 lbs. They must have no physical condition or limitations which would make it impossible for them to get in or out of the aircraft unassisted, and must be able to communicate with the pilot via the intercom.

  • Pre-boarding: 1/2 to 1 hour before take-off; crew/passenger briefing and paperwork
  • Boarding: Passenger placement, seat belt check
  • Engine start-up/Run-up: Before take off, run-up of engines and taxi to active runway
  • Flight time (in air): Aerial tour lasting about 20-30 minutes
  • Landing/Taxi/Engine shut down: Safe return back to base and taxi back to the area where you boarded the plane
  • Disembark: Once the plane is secure and the crew has opened the exit(s)
  • Total Time on Board: Your entire experience is expected to last about – 40-45 minutes

 

  • AT-6 – The AT-6 family of Advanced Trainers first entered service in 1938, and variants continued in service until recent times. “Ace” is an AT-6A; about 1,800 were built. The naval version of the AT-6 is the SNJ; the approximate equivalent of the AT-6A is SNJ-3, and another 270 of these were built. In RAF and RCAF service, the AT-6 was known as the “Harvard”.

 

Houston Wing AT-6 Advanced Trainer

Number of Passengers – 1 behind the pilot

Price $345

Accessibility – Must be able to climb onto the wing and into the cockpit

Ear Protection – Headset (provided or bring your own)

Flight Intensity – medium easy ride

 

 

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  • BT-13 – The BT-13/BT-15/SNV family of Basic Trainers first entered service in 1940, and was finally retired in the late 1960’s. The Houston Wing aircraft is a BT-13A; about 7,000 of this model were built. It is estimated that only about 40 remain in flying condition today. The Houston Wing BT-13 spent 30 years as a public attraction on top of a Utah welding shop before being rescued and returned to flight status.

 

Houston Wing Consolidated Vultee BT-13

Number of Passengers – 1 behind the pilot

Price $275

Accessibility – Must be able to climb onto the wing and into the cockpit

Ear Protection – Headset (provided or bring your own)

Flight Intensity – medium easy ride

 

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  • C-60 – The Lockheed C-60A is a twin-engine transport based on the Model 18 Lodestar. The Model 18 was a civilian airliner, developed as a competitor to the Douglas DC-3. Slightly smaller and faster than the DC-3, it soon was in service with many airlines around the world.

 

Houston Wing C-60 Lockheed

Number of Passengers – behind the pilot 8

Price $245 per person w/min of 4 passengers

Accessibility – Must be able to climb onto the wing and into the cockpit

Ear Protection – Headset (provided or bring your own)

Flight Intensity – medium easy ride

 

 

C-60-1

 

  • N3N – A Primary Trainer designed by the US Navy’s Bureau of Aeronautics, the N3N was built by the Naval Aircraft Factory at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was that facility’s most numerous product. The design was originated in 1934 and was a relatively advanced type in its time. The fuselage structure is of aluminum angle and “tees”, covered with a combination of fabric and removable aluminum panels. The flying surfaces are covered with fabric. Most N3Ns were removed from service soon after the end of WWII, but some remained in service for many more years; as late as 1961, some float-equipped N3Ns were still serving at the US Naval Academy as the US armed forces’ last biplane.

 

Houston Wing N3N Primary Trainer

Number of Passengers – 1 behind the pilot

Price $255

Accessibility – Must be able to climb onto the wing and into the cockpit

Ear Protection – Headset (provided or bring your own)

Flight Intensity – medium easy ride

 

 

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  • PT-19 – The Fairchild PT-19 “Cornell” was a primary trainer developed for the U.S. Army Air Force. Traditionally, primary training was done using biplanes like the Stearman PT-17 “Kaydet” or Navy N3N. However, later it was felt that the transition from the very stable and forgiving biplanes to the more challenging monoplane basic and advanced trainers was too abrupt; the student would feel overconfident after mastering the biplane and have trouble adjusting to the later monoplanes. Therefore, the Army decided to introduce monoplane primary trainers like the PT-19. With a higher wing loading and stall speed, it was more similar to the next step in the training, the BT-13.

 

 

Houston Wing PT-19 Fairchild

Number of Passengers – 1 behind the pilot

Price $225

Accessibility – Must be able to climb onto the wing and into the cockpit

Ear Protection – Headset (provided or bring your own)

Flight Intensity – medium easy ride

 

 

pt19 flight